Ingrown Toenail Surgery- What to Expect

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Ingrown Toenail Surgery Explained- What to Expect

Having an ingrown toenail is extremely painful, and most people try to handle it themselves. However, constantly digging at your toenail at home can do additional harm.

You may think that ingrown toenail surgery is unusual, but it’s actually a common procedure. If a nail will not respond to the usual treatment, surgical treatment is recommended.

If your doctor has told you that you need surgery on your ingrown toenail, you may be nervous. It helps to understand why surgery is prescribed and what you can expect.

Why Ingrown Toenail Surgery?

An ingrown toenail is a common painful condition. Generally, it occurs on the big toe. The nail grows into your skin instead of growing outward normally. Ingrown toenails are one of a number of common foot problems.

Ingrown toenails generally occur as a result of improper shoes or toe injuries. It may also occur due to genetic conditions, aggressive pedicures, or split nails. Traditional treatments for ingrown toenails include foot soaks, nail trimming, and good foot hygiene.

Unfortunately, ingrown toenails often come back again and again. There’s a risk of infection as well. These risks lead many doctors to recommend toenail surgery to correct the problem permanently.

You Won’t Need Anesthesia

Most ingrown toenail surgery is a quick procedure done at a podiatrist’s office. You will not be put under general anesthesia. Instead, you will be given an injection that will numb your toe.

The injection will sting and burn for a few seconds, but after that, there is no pain. A rubber band tourniquet is applied to the base of the toe to reduce bleeding during the surgery. The fact that you won’t be knocked out for a major surgical procedure is a significant relief to most patients.

A Section of Toenail Will Be Cut Away

Rather than cutting only the edge of the nail, a podiatrist will cut a larger section of the toenail away. Only the side near the site of the ingrown nail is affected.

A deep cut is made, and forceps are used to pull away the nail. This exposes the skin below the nail, or the nail bed, in that area.

Once the nail is cut away, the doctor will use cotton swabs to clean the area. The cleaning solution will repeatedly be applied for several minutes to clean the site of the surgery completely. Afterward, a bandage will be wrapped around your toe.

You Can Walk Right After Surgery

If you’re concerned about having trouble walking, you don’t need to worry. After bandaging, you will still be able to wear shoes and walk normally. You can remove the bandage after two days.

You will have to wash the surgical area every day, and you may be given antibiotic ointment to prevent infections. You may have minor throbbing or pain after the anesthetic wears off, but the discomfort is minimal.

The solution is permanent. Ingrown toenail surgery is a common, well-proven procedure that can end your ingrown nail issues for good. If you’re interested in learning more about common foot problems, and how you can handle them, Call our office +1-626-385-3338 – or – click here to request an appointment!

Bunion Surgery: 5 Most Common Questions

  • Bunion Surgery Schematic

5 Most Common Questions About Bunion Surgery

Bunion surgery is typically a surgical procedure to correct a deformity near the big toe on your foot. This procedure is usually recommended when other treatment options fail to relieve the symptoms of a bunion.

Before undergoing this procedure, it helps to learn more as possible to ensure it’s the right treatment for you.

In this post, we’re are going to share some of the common questions about the surgery.

1. Do I Need the Surgery?

In most cases, if the bunion is not painful, then surgery is not necessary. Even though sometimes bunions increase in size, doctors don’t recommend surgery as the first treatment option.

Instead, wearing protective shoes is the ideal measure to slow the progression of a bunion’s size. Keep in mind that the surgery should not be performed for cosmetic reasons. Sometimes there can be an ongoing pain even when there’s no bunion.

2. What Kind of Preparation is Needed?

Before the bunion surgery, you may need to undergo several tests to check your overall health. Some tests may include a  cardiogram to check your heart’s function, X-rays to assess your lungs, and blood and urine tests to see if you have any underlying conditions.

If you’re taking medications, such as aspirin or other blood thinners, you’ll need to stop taking them a few days before surgery.

3. Are There Different Surgical Procedures for Bunions?

It’s helpful for your doctor to explain the different bunion surgery options you have. This helps in recommending the right procedure for you. Typically, there are three common surgery techniques:

Bone cutting

Podiatrists use this method to cut the deviated bones. It also changes the bone shape to ensure a correct position.

Bone fusion

In this procedure, the doctor joins the non-essential joints to realign the entire bone of the foot and remedy the deviation.

Bunion shaving

This is recommended for small bunions, and it involves removing excess bone from the inside of the bone. Ligament repair is also necessary here to ensure proper to alignment.

4. What Is the Expected Recovery Period?

Generally, it depends on your bunion size and the type of surgery selected for you. For most patients, this takes about six to eight weeks for the bones to mend after the procedure.

Most patients usually resume their normal routine and activities three months after the surgery.

It’s not recommended to drive until the surgery heals, especially if you’re using restrive devices such as casts and boots.

5. What Is the Cost?

The charge for bunion surgery depends on the size of your bunion and type of procedure. In general, you can expect a cost range of $3,000 to $5,000. Your doctor will provide more information on the cost during your initial visit.

Since the surgery is a medical procedure, most insurance plans usually cover it. However, if the purpose of the surgery is to improve the foot’s appearance, then this may not be covered. Your insurer and doctor will help you understand your options.

Bunion Surgery – The Bottom Line

The surgical approach for bunions varies depending on the severity of the condition. As a patient, you should only consider this treatment if taking anti-inflammatory medication, using toe splints, and wearing wider shoes fail to relieve your bunion.

Also, don’t wait too long as going without treatment can lead to other foot problems and deformities. If you have any questions, call our office or if you would like to request an appointment

 

Hammertoe Surgery: How to Recover Quickly

  • postop hammertoe surgery recovery

 
 

Hammertoe Correction: What to Expect After Surgery

Hammertoe can only be treated with extra padding or special shoes for so long.

Eventually, many people with curled toes consider hammertoe surgery for permanent pain relief.

Nobody wants to have surgery. But it’s often the best way to get back to wearing your favorite shoes and living your life.

If you’re considering hammertoe surgery, you’re not alone.

Here’s a quick guide to recovery and what to expect after the operation:

How Long Does Recovery Take?

The length of your recovery is dependent on the type of procedure you have and your personal circumstances.

You may start feeling better after a few days. Full healing may take between 2 and 6 weeks.

How Can I Aid Recovery?

You can’t speed up the recovery process. But you can make it easier.

Swelling is common after surgery. 

Try the RICE method to combat inflammation.

RICE stands for rest, ice, compression and elevation.

You’ll also have a bandage on your foot as well as stitches. Avoid getting the bandage wet and do your best to keep it clean.

Finally, you may be given a prescription for pain medication. If not, you can take acetaminophen, ibuprofen or naproxen.

Be sure to take these as directed – NEVER take a higher dosage than recommended by the manufacturer.

Will I Be Able to Walk?

It’s also helpful to limit the movement you need to do. Get up and walk around. Go to the bathroom. But don’t go too far until 2 to 3 days after your surgery.

Get up and walk around. Go to the bathroom. But don’t go too far until 2 to 3 days after your surgery.

Generally, you shouldn’t put weight on your foot for a few days. And only do so if it doesn’t cause pain.

In some cases, you’ll be given crutches or a cane to help you get around for a few days up to a few weeks. The length of time depends on the surgery you have, the number of toes operated on, and the healing process.

You’ll also be given a special shoe for the healing foot to increase mobility and support healing.

Are There Complications?

Complications related to hammertoe surgery are similar to other operations. Infection, bleeding, and damage to blood vessels are nerves are all potential complications.

If you are given general anesthesia, you also assume those risks.

Issues related to the specific surgery are rare. But there is a chance your toe will feel unstable because the procedure requires cutting the ligaments.

There is also a slight likelihood the hammertoe will come back.

Finally, if the surgeon fuses the bone in the toe back together, there is a small chance the bone might not heal.

When Should I Call a Doctor After Hammertoe Surgery?

Here are a few good reasons to ring your doctor after surgery:

  • If the wound is bleeding or there’s drainage
  • If the swelling increases after a few days
  • If pain medication isn’t helping
  • If you have a fever

Hammertoe is a painful problem with a straightforward solution. If you’re ready to straighten your toes and live pain-free, contact us today.