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6 Must-Know Tips to Help Prevent Ingrown Toenails

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6 Must-Know Tips to Help Prevent Ingrown Toenails

Few pains in this world beat the pain of an ingrown toenail. The condition sends something of a sting through your entire body, and can be almost unbearable to live with.

While some people are prone to ingrown toenails, others only experience them on rare occasions. Whichever group you fall into, there are things which can be done to prevent ingrown toenails in the future.

Here are 6 must-know tips to help you prevent ingrown toenails.

1. Trim Your Nails

The best way to prevent the existence of ingrown toenails is to trim your toenails right in the first place.

Many people, when trimming their nails, tend to trim them down to the skin. This is improper. What you need to do is leave a bit of nail off of the skin, all the while trimming in a straight line.

Doing this will prevent skin from growing up over your nails.

2. Wear Comfortable Footwear

Wearing comfortable footwear is necessary for a number of reasons, one of which is to prevent nasty ingrown toenails.

Shoes which are too tight either in the front or on the sides tend to crowd your toes together. Because they have no room to move, they are constantly making contact with the shoes themselves.

This constant collision will put stress on the nails, causing them to grow in unpredictable ways.

3. Soak Your Feet

A great way to cease the growth of ingrown toenails, and to keep your feet healthy in general is by soaking them on a regular basis. Soaking your feet will keep both your skin and your nails soft, allowing them to grow in a satisfactory manner.

The best way to soak your feet is with warm water and perhaps a bit of Epsom salt. Essential oils can also help to soothe and moisturize your skin.

4. Prioritize Foot Freedom

Because your shoes tend to put a lot of stress on your toenails, you should do without them as much as possible. The less you wear shoes, the less chance you have of developing ingrown toenails.

When you’re lounging around the house, opt for either bare feet or socks.

5. Don’t Pick at Your Cuticles

If you’ve developed a nasty habit of picking and tearing at your cuticles are toenails, you’ve got to try and stop as soon as possible.

When you pick your nails and cuticles, you make them misshapen. Misshapen nails will grow in most of the time, causing ingrown toenails on occasion.

6. Consult a Podiatrist

If you’ve tried everything but are still having trouble with ingrown toenails, it’s time to consult a podiatrist. A podiatrist will be able to assess your specific case and assist you in a way that best benefits you.

In some cases, podiatrists can perform ingrown toenail surgery. This is a quick surgery which will have you pain-free in close to no time.

We Can Help to Prevent Ingrown Toenails

If you’ve got chronic trouble with ingrown toenails, it might be time to talk to a podiatrist. Do you live in the San Dimas, California area? We here at Pacific Foot & Ankle Associates are the podiatrists you’re looking for.

With years of experience on our side, we know exactly must be done to prevent ingrown toenails from occurring.

Contact us to schedule an appointment today!

5 Basic Foot Care Essentials for Diabetics

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5 Basic Foot Care Essentials for Diabetics

Around 9% of the population has diabetes. One possible complication of diabetes is nerve damage in your feet. This leaves one very susceptible to a foot injury.

Because having diabetes can also lead to struggles fighting off infections, it is important to take proper preventative measures.

Do you have diabetes and want to make sure you avoid potential food injuries? Read below for five basic foot care essentials everyone should know.

1. Skin Checks

This is one of the easiest steps you can take. Try to touch and inspect your feet every day. Keep an eye out for anything out of the ordinary. This includes cuts, swelling, or bruises.

Also, make note of any areas that are tender. Don’t forget the sides and in between your toes.

If you have poor eyesight or flexibility that prevents you from checking your own feet, ask a loved one to help you.

Taking a few minutes each day to inspect your feet will help catch any problem early on.

2. Control Your Sugar

Another preventative aspect of basic foot care includes paying attention to your sugar levels. Work to stay within guidelines you have established with your doctor.

To accomplish this, be sure to eat according to your meal plan and pay lots of attention to carbohydrates. Always be consistent with any medication you take as part of managing your diabetes.

Another option for keeping your sugar in check is to do light non-impact exercise. This can be anything from walking and stretching to playing tennis or taking a dance class.

3. Always Wear Shoes

Managing diabetes doesn’t have to be stressful. There are many products available to help handle pain and prevent serious complications.

An important habit to get into is to never go barefoot. This can be hard during warm summer months, but simple injuries can become severe when you have diabetes.

Sometimes a stubbed toe can lead to ulcers. Keep slippers by your bed and always wear sturdy shoes when going outside. Avoid sandals and open-toe shoes.

You should also wear a clean pair of socks each day.

4. Wash and Dry Correctly

In order to keep your feet in good shape, you must properly wash and clean them. Doing this helps get rid of germs that may cause an infection.

Wash both your feet every day with soap. Try not to use hot water because it can damage the skin on your feet. If you have nerve damage in your feet, check the water temperature with your hand.

Gently remove any calluses with a pumice stone.

When finished, dry your feet completely. Rub some lotion to keep the skin soft.

5. Cut Toenails Straight Across

While this tip applies to everyone, it is especially important to those with diabetes. Always cut your toenails straight across. This helps avoid painful ingrown toenails.

Avoid cutting your toenails too short. If you have trouble cutting your own toenails, ask a loved one for help.

Get Started with Basic Foot Care

With these five tips, you are ready to start taking excellent care of your feet. Preventative care will help you avoid serious complications down the road.

If you are ready to get a better handle on your foot care or have some questions, schedule an appointment with us today.

Diabetic Socks: Everything You Need to Know about Them

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Everything You Need to Know about Diabetic Socks

More than 100 million Americans suffering from diabetes or prediabetes. It’s a growing health problem that causes pain and suffering.

One way diabetes causes problems is with the feet. But if you’re not careful, you can actually lose one or both feet because of diabetes.

Which is why diabetic socks are so necessary. Here’s what you need to know about these socks.

These Socks Wick Away Moisture

These amazing socks wick away moisture. This helps to prevent blistering.

But keeping your foot dry if you’re a diabetic is vitally important to your health. Wet feet means you’re more prone to infections.

Diabetic Socks Protect Your Feet

It’s uncomfortable for any sock wearer when the seam of their sock rubs against their shoe. With these socks, there’s no need to worry about additional foot pain because there are no seams.

There is also no elastic so they won’t form lumps in your shoe.

These socks fit snugly so there’s no problem with them falling down on your as you go throughout your day. They also won’t constrict your legs or feet.

They’re designed to minimize friction and pressure points. That means less pain and discomfort throughout your day.

This is great news since it’s recommended that diabetes patients should wear these socks from the moment they wake up until they go to bed at night.

They Offer Support

Diabetic socks are cushioned so you’ll feel supported while you’re wearing them.

You also have choices in what type of support you want in your socks. They come with different levels of padding and in different colors.

For active people who are on their feet for long periods of time, look for socks with adequate heel padding. That will provide long-lasting support and comfort for you.

Sports enthusiasts should choose socks with padding near the toes and heels.

Some socks have an increased thickness made of the same material. Other manufacturers use a special gel.

You can also choose between over-the-calf and over-the-knee socks. This depends on whether you suffer from circulation problems.

The Different Types of Socks Available

Not all socks work the same way. They are each made depending on the needs of the individual wearer. Here are the different types available on the market.

Enter Celiant

This synthetic yarn turns body heat into infrared energy. That energy is then reabsorbed by your body.

Infrared is known to boost the flow of blood, regulate temperature, and enhance cell performance.

Smart Socks

These use fiber optic technology. They incorporate pressure, moisture, and temperature sensors within the socks.

This provides the wearer with real-time feedback via a mobile app. You’ll know when your foot is about to get swollen or may be prone to infections.

You can then make necessary adjustments to avoid harm or pain to your foot.

Silver and Socks

These socks contain threads of silver. The silver minimizes heat loss to keep your feet warm. They also fight off bacterial and fungal infections.

Teflon-Reinforced Yarn

The Teflon is used in the heel and toe areas of the sock. Teflon helps to reduce friction against the skin. It also makes the socks more durable.

Get the Right Help

We’re here to help guide you toward a healthier, more active life with diabetes. Don’t wait until the problems become too big for you to handle alone.

If you’re new to our practice, fill out one of our forms and we’ll get back to you ASAP.

Best Athlete’s Foot Medicine and If You Need It


The Best Athlete’s Food Medicine and If You Need It

If you’ve ever experienced athlete’s foot, you know that the affliction can be painful and uncomfortable. For some, including those with diabetes or a compromised immune system, it can even be downright dangerous.

If you suspect you may have athlete’s foot, you may not know what steps to take next. The good news is that there are treatments available to help curb your symptoms and make the recovery process much easier.

Today, we’re taking a look at the best athlete’s foot medicine, and how to discern if it’s required for your case.

Ready to learn more? Let’s get started!

Learn the Symptoms of Athlete’s Foot

Before you begin researching the best athlete’s foot medicine, you’ll need to figure out whether or not you need it in the first place.

Some of the infection’s telltale symptoms, such as a rash and blisters, may actually signal another skin affliction.

If you experience one or more of these symptoms, check with a foot care professional to get a true diagnosis:

  • Burning, inflammation, and itching between your toes or on the soles of your feet
  • An itchy, blistering rash anywhere on your feet
  • Dry, cracked, exposed or peeling skin on your feet (mainly sides and soles)
  • Discolored, peeling, or dislodged toenails

Understand How It’s Contracted

Consider if you’ve entered into an environment recently where a fungal infection like athlete’s foot might be present. Some of the most common ways to contract the affliction include:

  • Sharing your shoes or socks with someone else
  • Going barefoot in a public place, such as a gym shower
  • Not allowing wet or sweaty feet to dry properly
  • Wearing too-tight shoes for too long

An expert analysis can determine if your symptoms are infection-related, or if another foot problem may be the root cause.

Research the Best Athlete’s Foot Medicine

If you’re diagnosed with athlete’s foot, you’ll want to get started on a treatment plan immediately. Taking quick action can help stop any fungal growth in its tracks and help you heal faster.

While it can be tempting to grab an over-the-counter antifungal cream, keep in mind that this well-meaning approach may be less effective than you hope.

Most of these store-bought creams will provide temporary relief but will not address the core of the issue.

The best athlete’s foot medicine for you will depend on the severity of your case.

Mild Cases of Athlete’s Foot

If your infection is mild, you may be able to solve the problem by improving your foot hygiene.

Wash your feet with soap and water regularly and apply powder to keep your feet dry. Be sure to take notice of the area between your toes!

More Serious Cases

If your case is more severe, or if your mild athlete’s foot doesn’t respond to better hygiene, it’s time to go in for a foot care consultation.

If a fungus caused your infection, a professional can prescribe you a more powerful antifungal medication to address it.

The medication may be a topical one, or you may take it orally, depending on your case.

On the other hand, bacteria might cause your infection, rather than a fungus. While they often cause many of the same symptoms, these are two distinct substances that require different treatments.

If bacteria are the culprits, you’ll take an antibiotic medication to address it.

Professional Foot Care You Can Trust

Healthy feet are critical to your well-being. In fact, your big toe alone helps control your gait, balance, and mobility!

Whether you’re dealing with athlete’s foot or a host of other foot-related injuries and afflictions, you want to work with a professional healthcare expert.

That’s where we come in.

We’re a team of foot and ankle associates dedicated to helping our clients address and overcome myriad needs. From common foot problems to more advanced issues such as those associated with diabetes, we’ve got you covered.

Request an appointment today to get started. We’ll get you back on your feet in no time.

How to Identify and Treat a Sprained Ankle

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How to Identify and Treat a Sprained Ankle

Do you think that you sprained an ankle?

Is your ankle swollen and bruised? Can you place weight on it?

These are just a few of the symptoms of a sprained ankle. In fact, 2 million Americans suffer from an acute ankle injury each year.

Ankle injuries account for roughly 20% of all injuries suffered in amateur sports.

If your ankle injury is not properly identified and treated, it could lead to chronic issues.

Read on to learn how to identify a sprained ankle and the anticipated treatment plan for such an injury.

How do Sprained Ankles Typically Occur?

Sprained ankles frequently happen while running or playing sports. The injury itself occurs during the rapid movements involved with these activities.

A sprained ankle can also happen accidentally through a misstep.

More specifically, the injury is sustained when the foot is planted and the ankle rolls over outward or inward.

When the ankle rolls over, ligaments on the outside or inside of the ankle stretch and tear. In some cases, you may physically feel the tear or hear a pop.

This will cause immediate and excruciating pain.

What are the Symptoms of a Sprained Ankle?

You will know the second you sprained an ankle. In addition to the pain, walking will be a challenge as you will be hard pressed to put any weight on the ankle.

Shortly after the injury occurs, swelling will begin with bruising to follow. Routine movements may be painful and the ankle tender to touch.

What Should you do Immediately After the Injury?

If an athletic trainer is present, the first course of action may be to apply a compression wrap. This is intended to limit swelling, which in turn, may help the ankle feel better later.

Without the help of a trainer, a common mistake that is made is removing the shoe. On the other hand, you should tighten the shoelaces to apply compression. This works especially well with high top basketball shoes.

Once you are in a position to rest, it is time to ice and elevate the ankle. When you aren’t icing, compression wrap is still beneficial.

Ultimately, the best way for the ankle to heal is to stay off of it.

When Should You Seek Medical Attention?

The severity of the ankle injury will dictate whether a visit to the doctor is necessary. If the pain persists and is not improving with ice and rest, medical attention is warranted.

At this point, there is a potential that the ankle is fractured and not sprained. X-rays may be required on the ankle to rule out a fracture.

If an ankle sprain is confirmed, the doctor may recommend wearing compression socks or an ankle brace while working or doing light activity.

Wrapping It Up

As alluded to earlier, the best way to recover from an ankle sprain is rest. Staying off the ankle will allow the body to naturally repair the torn ligaments.

Ice, compression, and elevation are also part of the treatment process.

If you have any additional questions about sprained ankles, please do not hesitate to contact us for assistance.

4 Diabetes Products to Help Relieve Your Foot Pain

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4 Diabetes Products to Help Relieve Your Foot Pain

As a diabetic, you have to be constantly mindful of what you put into your body. And, if you have some form of neuropathy, you need to stay on top of managing your symptoms. 

You’re not alone in managing neuropathy. About 60-70% of diabetics have some form of neuropathy according to the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases. 

If you have peripheral neuropathy, you likely have pain in your fingers, legs, and feet. You can usually manage the pain by getting your diet under control, exercising, and quitting smoking. 

But, there are some days when even naturally managing your diabetic foot pain isn’t enough. On those days, you need diabetes products to help relieve your foot pain.

Here are some products to help treat your foot pain.

Diabetic Shoes

When you have peripheral neuropathy, you should avoid walking around barefoot. The risk is too great that you will open a new wound on your foot and not realize it.

Diabetic socks are made of anti-bacterial fibers which are designed to wick away moisture from your feet. They also help reduce rubbing and irritation which can cause blisters.

Diabetic shoes and insoles mold to your feet to provide exactly the right support. Having the right shoes reduces pinching which can lead to foot ulcers.

Compression Socks and Stockings

Diabetic foot pain is caused largely by the weakening of the veins in your legs. The vein walls become too loose to let blood circulate back up your legs, so unoxygenated blood pools in your feet. 

Compression socks and stockings put a slight pressure on your legs, and by extension, your veins, to give them the support they need to carry blood from your feet to your lungs.

Like many diabetic products, there is no one size fits all solution for compression socks. Speak to your doctor about the level of pressure you need in compression socks. 

Capsaicin Cream

A capsaicin cream is a topical treatment applied to the skin. The main ingredient in capsaicin creams is a compound found in hot peppers. 

When applied to the skin, capsaicin first stimulates the nerve endings, which can cause a brief jump in pain. This stimulation is followed by decreasing intensity of the pain as the capsaicin starts to block signals in the nerve endings.

In a study of 252 individuals, 58.4% of patients reported an improvement in pain relief by applying a capsaicin cream. 

While you can pick up a capsaicin cream at your local drugstore, check with your doctor before using one. Capsaicin can react with other drugs and irritate your skin. 

OTC Pain Relief

For days when you have mild nerve pain from diabetes, over the counter pain relievers are a good option for finding relief. Many diabetes patients will turn to their regular painkillers like Advil or Tylenol. 

If you find you’re taking these OTC painkillers too frequently, you should speak to your doctor about other medications you can take. If your pain level is high, your doctor might prescribe an antidepressant or anti-seizure medication, both of which help with pain management. 

Ask Your Doctor About the Best Diabetes Products For You

Before you select new diabetes products to try, you should consult your regular physician and podiatrist first. 

If you’re looking for expert advice on incorporating new diabetes products into your treatment, schedule an appointment with us today.

Why Do My Heels Hurt? Questions For Your Doctor

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Why Do My Heels Hurt? Questions For Your Doctor

Are you feeling pain in your heels when you walk or run? Is there a distinctive tingling or burning in your pedestrian support system? 

Heel pain can be incredibly obtrusive and can be debilitating to your day to day. There are a plethora of problems that involve the feet as we get older. 

The good news is that many of those problems actually have solutions and explanations. If you’re asking yourself, “Why do my heels hurt?”, then consider a few of these questions and do some prep-work before seeing your doctor.

Here’s a list of questions for your doctor regarding heel pain:

1. What Is The Right Kind Of Shoe For Me

Whether you’re a gym fanatic who runs a lot or live in a big city and walk plenty, a good pair of shoes can save you. Different shoes are made to create support for different parts of your foot based on the activity of the user. 

When choosing a shoe, it is important to take into consideration every detail of how the shoe is constructed and where the support system within the shoe lies. Some people prefer the more barefoot feeling approach, while others require heavy cushion under their feet on a daily basis. 

Whatever your activities are, asking “Why do my heels hurt?” on a daily basis means you probably need new shoes. A doctor or foot specialist can point you in the right direction. 

2. Ask “Why Do My Heels Hurt?”

Is It Because of Plantar Fasciitis?

Plantar fasciitis occurs when there is extreme overuse of the heel and could leave you asking “Why do my heels hurt?” It isn’t completely uncommon either, as 1 in 10 people will develop plantar fasciitis in their lifetime. 

If left untreated this can become a major issue for your feet. Ask your doctor about plantar fasciitis and they’ll be able to tell you if you suffer from it. If it isn’t taken care of, it can make for a very serious situation and even lead to heel spurs.

3. Ask About Heel Spurs

Heel spurs are bony structures that grow from the heel bone area. They create major pain in the heels. If you’ve been dealing with heel pain for a long time and possibly plantar fasciitis but didn’t know it, you may have created a space for heel spurs.

Heel spurs often require surgery and can slow your life down for some time. The key is to have your heels evaluated before it is too late.

4. Do I have Bursitis? 

Bursitis is the deepening of the bursa. In the foot atrium, there is a pillow-like sac that bonds with the bone or curves around it. The atrium is like a bean bag that gives cushion to the bond and the bone.

If there is an abrasion or heavy burden consistently on it, the sac will become afflicted and unhealthy, which creates a lot of pain. 

5. Do I Walk or Run Correctly?

Yes, there is a proper way to walk, run, and even stand. If you’ve got poor running posture you can absolutely be putting more pressure than is necessary on your heels. 

With an evaluation from your doctor or physical therapist, you can learn to evenly distribute your weight and pressure when walking or running. 

For more info on optimal foot and ankle care, call our office +1-626-385-3338 – or – request an appointment!

 

Ingrown Toenail Surgery- What to Expect

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Ingrown Toenail Surgery Explained- What to Expect

Having an ingrown toenail is extremely painful, and most people try to handle it themselves. However, constantly digging at your toenail at home can do additional harm.

You may think that ingrown toenail surgery is unusual, but it’s actually a common procedure. If a nail will not respond to the usual treatment, surgical treatment is recommended.

If your doctor has told you that you need surgery on your ingrown toenail, you may be nervous. It helps to understand why surgery is prescribed and what you can expect.

Why Ingrown Toenail Surgery?

An ingrown toenail is a common painful condition. Generally, it occurs on the big toe. The nail grows into your skin instead of growing outward normally. Ingrown toenails are one of a number of common foot problems.

Ingrown toenails generally occur as a result of improper shoes or toe injuries. It may also occur due to genetic conditions, aggressive pedicures, or split nails. Traditional treatments for ingrown toenails include foot soaks, nail trimming, and good foot hygiene.

Unfortunately, ingrown toenails often come back again and again. There’s a risk of infection as well. These risks lead many doctors to recommend toenail surgery to correct the problem permanently.

You Won’t Need Anesthesia

Most ingrown toenail surgery is a quick procedure done at a podiatrist’s office. You will not be put under general anesthesia. Instead, you will be given an injection that will numb your toe.

The injection will sting and burn for a few seconds, but after that, there is no pain. A rubber band tourniquet is applied to the base of the toe to reduce bleeding during the surgery. The fact that you won’t be knocked out for a major surgical procedure is a significant relief to most patients.

A Section of Toenail Will Be Cut Away

Rather than cutting only the edge of the nail, a podiatrist will cut a larger section of the toenail away. Only the side near the site of the ingrown nail is affected.

A deep cut is made, and forceps are used to pull away the nail. This exposes the skin below the nail, or the nail bed, in that area.

Once the nail is cut away, the doctor will use cotton swabs to clean the area. The cleaning solution will repeatedly be applied for several minutes to clean the site of the surgery completely. Afterward, a bandage will be wrapped around your toe.

You Can Walk Right After Surgery

If you’re concerned about having trouble walking, you don’t need to worry. After bandaging, you will still be able to wear shoes and walk normally. You can remove the bandage after two days.

You will have to wash the surgical area every day, and you may be given antibiotic ointment to prevent infections. You may have minor throbbing or pain after the anesthetic wears off, but the discomfort is minimal.

The solution is permanent. Ingrown toenail surgery is a common, well-proven procedure that can end your ingrown nail issues for good. If you’re interested in learning more about common foot problems, and how you can handle them, Call our office +1-626-385-3338 – or – click here to request an appointment!

5 Tips for Giving Yourself A Diabetic Foot Exam

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5 Tips for Giving Yourself A Diabetic Foot Exam

Over 29 million Americans have diabetes. Those with diabetes must be sure to take care of their health and watch for any complications.

One concern for those living with diabetes is complications with their feet. Diabetes can lead to nerve damage leaving one unable to feel hot or cold. This lack of sensitivity can lead to injuries very easily.

This is why conducting a diabetic foot exam is crucial.

Are you living with diabetes and trying to best take care of yourself? Read below for five tips for giving yourself a proper foot exam!

1. Find a Comfortable Position for Giving Yourself a Diabetic Foot Exam

In order to properly assess your feet, you need to get in a comfortable and stable position. If you have poor flexibility or excess belly weight, you may have difficulty seeing your feet. If this is the case, ask a family member or caretaker for help.

Try sitting on a bed or toilet for stability. Make sure there will be room in front of you to pull your leg up on top of the other one. If you recently showered, be sure to completely dry your feet before beginning the exam.

2. First Focus on the Bottom

Gently move your ankle so the bottom of your foot is visible. If you are unable to achieve this position, try using a mirror.

Checking these areas will help avoid many foot complications possible with diabetes.

Scan the balls of your feet for bumps or rough texture. Check the soles for bumps and lumps which could signal bone or muscle problems. Also be sure to check your heels. Keep a look out for dry cracked skin.

Be sure to moisturize with lotion. Even small cracks can become infected.

3. Get Touchy Feely

During your diabetic foot exam, make sure to feel your entire foot. Pay attention for any drastic temperature differences or bumps. There are foot infrared thermometers that can be helpful in detecting circulation issues you may be unable to see.

Make sure to note any tenderness or pain you notice here. There are many options for dealing with diabetic foot pain.

4. Use your Eyes

Make sure to a visual inspection of your feet. Again, note any bumps or areas that look abnormal. Keep an eye on any scabs or rough textures.

Decreased blood flow can make skin look thin or shiny so be sure to note any overall skin appearance changes.

5. Pay Attention to Toes

Make sure your toenails are a normal color. Spread your toes with your fingers to check in between for any areas or red skin or ingrown toenails.

If you haven’t had previous complications, try doing an exam weekly. But if you have a history of complications, be sure to do an exam every day. This will help you keep a close eye on any issues.

Follow these five tips and you will be on your way to your own diabetic foot exam. Still have questions or concerns? Call our office +1-626-385-3338 or if you prefer to reach out to us via email, we will be happy to help!

Bunion Surgery: 5 Most Common Questions

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5 Most Common Questions About Bunion Surgery

Bunion surgery is typically a surgical procedure to correct a deformity near the big toe on your foot. This procedure is usually recommended when other treatment options fail to relieve the symptoms of a bunion.

Before undergoing this procedure, it helps to learn more as possible to ensure it’s the right treatment for you.

In this post, we’re are going to share some of the common questions about the surgery.

1. Do I Need the Surgery?

In most cases, if the bunion is not painful, then surgery is not necessary. Even though sometimes bunions increase in size, doctors don’t recommend surgery as the first treatment option.

Instead, wearing protective shoes is the ideal measure to slow the progression of a bunion’s size. Keep in mind that the surgery should not be performed for cosmetic reasons. Sometimes there can be an ongoing pain even when there’s no bunion.

2. What Kind of Preparation is Needed?

Before the bunion surgery, you may need to undergo several tests to check your overall health. Some tests may include a  cardiogram to check your heart’s function, X-rays to assess your lungs, and blood and urine tests to see if you have any underlying conditions.

If you’re taking medications, such as aspirin or other blood thinners, you’ll need to stop taking them a few days before surgery.

3. Are There Different Surgical Procedures for Bunions?

It’s helpful for your doctor to explain the different bunion surgery options you have. This helps in recommending the right procedure for you. Typically, there are three common surgery techniques:

Bone cutting

Podiatrists use this method to cut the deviated bones. It also changes the bone shape to ensure a correct position.

Bone fusion

In this procedure, the doctor joins the non-essential joints to realign the entire bone of the foot and remedy the deviation.

Bunion shaving

This is recommended for small bunions, and it involves removing excess bone from the inside of the bone. Ligament repair is also necessary here to ensure proper to alignment.

4. What Is the Expected Recovery Period?

Generally, it depends on your bunion size and the type of surgery selected for you. For most patients, this takes about six to eight weeks for the bones to mend after the procedure.

Most patients usually resume their normal routine and activities three months after the surgery.

It’s not recommended to drive until the surgery heals, especially if you’re using restrive devices such as casts and boots.

5. What Is the Cost?

The charge for bunion surgery depends on the size of your bunion and type of procedure. In general, you can expect a cost range of $3,000 to $5,000. Your doctor will provide more information on the cost during your initial visit.

Since the surgery is a medical procedure, most insurance plans usually cover it. However, if the purpose of the surgery is to improve the foot’s appearance, then this may not be covered. Your insurer and doctor will help you understand your options.

Bunion Surgery – The Bottom Line

The surgical approach for bunions varies depending on the severity of the condition. As a patient, you should only consider this treatment if taking anti-inflammatory medication, using toe splints, and wearing wider shoes fail to relieve your bunion.

Also, don’t wait too long as going without treatment can lead to other foot problems and deformities. If you have any questions, call our office or if you would like to request an appointment